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MIKROKOSMOS

 

Sepän talo, (Blacksmiths House)

Rauma, Finland

22nd May  - 30th June 2015

Mikrocosmos, Rauma, Finland is a project where five artists fom diverse arts practice worked experimentally, exploring the intersections between human life, art and science at Sepän talo, a large, disused house.Raumars Artist in Residence Irene Rogan invited Tarja Kyllijoki, Katarina Mannio, and Leena  Vainio , to  work with her in an unconventional way towards the creation of art  that uses the model of the microcosm as an artistic proposition and  is engaged with the practice of research and experimentation as a public act. Throughout the project the artists opened the doors for ‘public observation’ of the works-in-progress.

Irene Rogan
Durational performative installation
pipe and dust_edited.jpg

Irene Rogan and Jari Sorjonen 

 

Collaboration #1

photography and installation

Still Life

'Still Life' is an exploration of the coal store unseen for decades. Jari ad Irene elevate this abandoned space and the found humble objects through photography, installations and text.

Irene Rogan and Jari Sorjenon

 

Collaboration #2

Installation and photography

da Vinci's Treasure

'Da Vinci's Treasure' created with photographer Jari Sorjenon, uses found abandoned objects seemingly untouched for several decades in the derelict cellar of the house. Whilst exploring this site and using natural light, the objects were photographed in situ then carefully removed, cleaned or painted and placed on velvet-swathed plinths in the ''salon' on the first floor, where there had been small sections of wallpaper gilded with gold paint, this process was documented and a selection of photographs was exhibited alongside the plinth work. Da Vinci's Salon' uses found materials and is site responsive to create an imagined salon inspired by Da Vinci's drapery drawings and in acknowledgement of  'the civilizational heritage impact of Da Vinci, as described by the Finnish at that time.

Irene Rogan

Installation

Breath of God

‘Breath of God’  is a spontaneous response to the small space at Sepän talo. Through the threshold of the open window the external world of the blossom tree, the garden and the light breath of air that entered the space carrying summer fragrances from the flowers. During the process of experimentation it brought to mind the following spiritual text from the New Testament:

 

‘The wind blows where it wills, and you hear the sound thereof, but cannot tell from where it came, and where it goes: so is every one that is born of the Spirit’.  

 

The work explores this mysterious notion of the wind and water as the Spirit of God.  Twelve bottles are placed on the floor containing water and forget-me-nots from the garden, layers of white muslin cloth are suspended from the ceiling. These found and bought materials refer to the symbolism found in spiritual writing and imagery in Christianity concerning the Holy Spirit. The key element to this installation is the animating presence of a breeze flowing through the work, which is not controllable, only made visible in the movement of the cloth and in the nature outside. Located on the wall small blackboards bear faded chalked words written over and over ‘Breath of God’, Spirit of Christ,  Henkäys Jumala.

 

Local Christian Pastor Mehis Metsala Pastor of Free Church Rauma, Finland was invited to collaborate on the interpretation of the words and imagery for ‘Breath of God’ from a spiritual perspective.

 

Mehis Metsala writes:

'Two aspects come to my mind the wind in the Biblical text is a metaphor describing the movements of the Spirit and as such it emphasizes the unpredictability of God. His thoughts, His ways and His dealings with us do not fit into any known pattern of ours. The sense of wonder is something we deeply need and often unconsciously seek.

 

‘The Breath of God’ is something so unique that only when we experience it, we feel really alive. We are designed to live the life God has prepared for us and only in union with Him we live in a deepest sense of the word'.

Katariina Mannio

Drawing intervention